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Victoria Colliery Disaster

Thursday, 14 June 1866

Sacred to the Memory of

THE
FOLLOWING
COAL
MINERS

WHO WERE KILLED BY AN EXPLOSION IN VICTORIA COLLIERY.
DUKINFIELD, ON THE 14th DAY OF JUNE, 1866.

Roll of the 38 miners who died with their references at Tameside Register Office

Verse composed by J. Burgess of Droylsden

†The composer was probably in error with his reference to chokedamp (also known as blackdamp or stythe), which is an asphyxiant that reduces the available oxygen content of air to a level unable to support life. It is a mixture of unbreathable gases left after oxygen is removed from air, typically consisting of nitrogen, carbon dioxide and water vapour. The gas encountered here was firedamp, which is a flammable gas found in coal mines that mostly consists of methane. Therefore, the miners would have either died in the explosion or shortly afterwards as a result of injuries and/or of asphyxia due to the presence of afterdamp. This gas is a toxic mixture of gases left after an explosion that mostly consists of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and nitrogen.

Roll of the 10 miners who were injured

Victoria Colliery Disaster, February 1849
The colliery disaster of 1866 was preceded by an explosion of firedamp that occurred 17 years earlier in 1849. In this explosion five miners lost their lives but their names are unknown.

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